Matthew

The Literary Art of Numbers | Matthew 1

Genealogies might look boring. But every profession trades in particularities. Biology has cells, programmers have bits of code, and designers have colors and shapes. The particularities here are people, people particularities, the best kind. And particularities make up the language like letters. Of course you won’t appreciate the fullness of Goethe if you don’t know german.

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The Subtlety of The Son of David and Abraham | Matthew 1:1

We often think that genealogies are lists of names, just a collection of people without any purpose or perspective. But nothing could be further from the truth.In Jesus’ family tree, there are hundreds, if not thousands of names missing.

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The Literary Structure of Matthew's Gospel

Matthew organizes his book into alternating sections of stories and teachings. And we know this not only because we see Jesus doing things and then having long speeches but also because after each of the teaching sections Matthew repeats the same phrase, “when Jesus finished saying these things…” And Matthew does this to indicate the end of each teaching section (7:28, 11:1, 13:53, 19:1, 26:1).

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Matthew 1:1 - Jesus' Subtle Identity

The first sentence in Matthew’s Gospel is this, “The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ.” Why start this way? By the time we get to Matthew’s Gospel, we’re in the fifth act of a five act play, we’re at the end of the story, so where are we in the story, what’s happening?

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Genealogies Aren’t Boring, You’re Boring | Matthew 1:1

By the time we get to Matthew’s Gospel, we’re in the fifth act of a five act play, we’re at the end of the story, so where are we in the story, what’s happening?

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Why Does Matthew Give Us Another Language and Then Translate It?

Why does Matthew provide the original words of Jesus in Aramaic, “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani”. Matthew never gives us any other Aramaic, so why here?

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Chronicles and Matthew

One of my interests right now is canonical ordering. I am completely convinced that the MT ordering is the correct. Thus, Chronicles is the last book in the OT. The end of 2 Chron is a quotation of Cyrus’ decree to build the temple . . .

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Against Scholarship; Or, The Case For Lay Hermeneutics

Rikk Watts points out that we have no intertestamental literature that connects the “Son of David” to healing. Furthermore, there are no OT texts that explicitly make that connection either. The Pharisees do not understand Jesus, but these two blind men do . . .

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Matthew 4 and Deuteronomy

In Matthew’s Gospel Jesus recapitulates Israel’s story (see Peter Leithart’s paper “Jesus as Israel: The Typological Structure of Matthew’s Gospel”). After Jesus’ 40 day fast, he is tempted by the Devil and resists using three quotations from Deuteronomy . . .

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Abraham and the Astrologers

In Matt 2 the astrologers see the star that leads them to Christ. Clearly, that has an Isaianic context. In Matt 1, there is an allusion to Isaiah 7 concerning Immanuael. In Is 7:11, YHWH says, “Ask a sign of the Lord your God; let it be deep as Sheol or high as heaven.” Thus, the star is the sign in heaven.

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